How to Set and Work with Resolution Settings 2018-01-02T20:12:25+00:00

Image Resolution

Imagener Enhanced, Professional & Unlimited versions

Image Resolution or Photo Resolution can be a technical topic but we’ve made it as easy as possible. Imagener can be used in a variety of ways to view and alter a photo’s resolution. The Resolution box in Imagener can be used in powerful ways, including a 2-step procedure we developed that can force resolution into images making them suitable for professional printing. There is a list of articles at the bottom of this page but for now, we’re going to discuss what the Resolution box is and what it can do.

This description uses Imagener Unlimited but the content is the same for Imagener Enhanced and Imagener Professional as well.

Why Change Image Resolution?

Image resolution may need to be changed higher or lower for the following reasons (not an exhaustive list):

  • To increase resolution for printing. Professional printers typically desire images to be in what is called “CMYK” mode but require images to have a minimum of 300 dots-per-inch resolution. (Again, see links below for further explanation of the basics and Imagener’s abilities regarding resolution.)
  • To increase resolution as a method of photo enlargement. In this case the user might consider repeating the enlargement process a second or even third time to achieve both a resolution change and a specific size. Note: If you change the resolution in Imagener, do not change the Width or Height on the same Resize pass. Click Resize, then change size on the result and click Resize again. Otherwise, the result will not have both the resolution you require plus the Width and Height you require in the same image.
  • To decrease the resolution from one with that is too high to one that is much lower (with accompanying lower file size) to make images load faster on web pages or via email. Note that images on a computer screen can have a great and satisfying appearance even though they have low (below 300 DPI) resolution.

Take the picture of strawberries in the following example. You may notice that this image has some blurriness before any operation is performed.  Imagener Professional and Unlimited can do a lot to correct this with their Resharp function, but for now focus on the Info section just above the Preview window.

Imagener shows large image at low resolution

There are two important attributes to note for this and any image once first loaded into Imagener:

  1. The dots-per-inch (DPI) resolution of the image. Look in the Resolution box once an image is loaded. Imagener tells you the DPI of the image before you perform any operations on it. The DPI of this image is 72 which is much too low for printing.
  2. The physical size of the image. Look at the Info section just above the Preview window. This section tells you how large (or small, depending on your desired need for the image) the image is. This window shows the Height first, then the Width. This image is 5,312 pixels tall, and 2,988 pixels wide, which is quite large.

Why are these important? Because if the image is large enough and again, depending on your desired use for the image, it can be made into a printable photo by adjusting its resolution. For this to work images must be physically large, because increasing the Resolution will make the image physically smaller.

This image was chosen specifically because of its low resolution and attendant size. With images that are this large, Imagener can be used to produce a printable 300 dots-per-inch result. However, images must be quite large to achieve satisfactory results when enlarging using the Resolution setting only. If your image is acquired from a web page for example, it is highly likely that it does not have sufficient size or resolution for output to a printer, and you should source your image from a royalty free image site that does.

To proceed, simply input “300” in the Resolution box and click Resize. Note the change in image size after Resizing using the Resolution setting to make sure it will meet your needs. This will change the image to 300 dots-per-inch which is sufficient resolution to print at home or send to a professional printing company.

There are two important attributes to note for this and any image once first loaded into Imagener:

  1. The dots-per-inch (DPI) resolution of the image. Look in the Resolution box once an image is loaded. Imagener tells you the DPI of the image before you perform any operations on it. The DPI of this image is 72 which is much too low for printing.
  2. The physical size of the image. Look at the Info section just above the Preview window. This section tells you how large (or small, depending on your desired need for the image) the image is. This window shows the Height first, then the Width. This image is 5,312 pixels tall, and 2,988 pixels wide, which is quite large.

Why are these important? Because if the image is large enough and again, depending on your desired use for the image, it can be made into a printable photo by adjusting its resolution. For this to work images must be physically large, because increasing the Resolution will make the image physically smaller.

This image was chosen specifically because of its low resolution and attendant size. With images that are this large, Imagener can be used to produce a printable 300 dots-per-inch result. However, images must be quite large to achieve satisfactory results when enlarging using the Resolution setting only. If your image is acquired from a web page for example, it is highly likely that it does not have sufficient size or resolution for output to a printer, and you should source your image from a royalty free image site that does.

To proceed, simply input “300” in the Resolution box and click Resize. Note the change in image size after Resizing using the Resolution setting to make sure it will meet your needs. This will change the image to 300 dots-per-inch which is sufficient resolution to print at home or send to a professional printing company.

Image Resolution & Photo Resolution Articles

There are two important attributes to note for this and any image once first loaded into Imagener:

  • Image Resolution 101

    How and Why to Change Resolution in Photos and Images
    Like many of our pages regarding resolution, this article first describes photo resolution requirements. The rare term “lossy” is described for image formats like JPG or GIF along with those image type characteristics. Scanned images are also described with a demonstration showing the limitations of using a scanner on printed images, and demonstrating that images can appear pleasing at first until one attempts enlargement.

  • Photo Resolution Computer & Printer Differences

    How Computers Treat Image Resolution Differently Than Printers & How to Find The Resolution of a Digital Photo
    This article describes the important process of determining the dots-per-inch (DPI) of an image assuming you do not have Imagener or other photo software to assist. The distinction between DPI and physical image dimension differences are described along with the importance of determining each. The concept of a pixel is described in the context of working with or enlarging images on a computer. How computers and printers differ in their treatment and measurement of images in terms of pixels and inches is reviewed, along with how these terms define what is meant by “image resolution.” This translates to the definition of “embedded resolution” and it’s importance in image enlargement and image printing. Some content may be elementary for various readers, but this article also describes complex resolution topics and importantly the counterintuitive notion that higher DPI images actually can have smaller physical dimensions because given two images of equal size on a computer screen, when placed in a word processing document or printed out the higher DPI image must pack more pixels into a smaller space making the image appear smaller.

  • Photoshop® Photo Enlargement

    How Photo Enlargement Relates to Photo Editing Software
    This important article describes photo enlargement in the context of manipulating images in photo software like Photoshop®. Imagener can load Photoshop PSD directly, and a comparison is drawn between the antiquated enlargement engines inside Photoshop® and the up-to-four advanced enlargement engines that Imagener Unlimited has for example. It shows how Photoshop does not try to address pixelated resolution issues even in it’s most recent versions. We included this page in the discussion of resolution as a means of easily demonstrating Photoshop’s® shortcomings, and the shortcomings of all photo editing software in dealing with the resolution of photos.

  • Digital Photo Enlarging

    How Digital Image Enlargers Outperform Hardware Photographic Enlargers
    Our Digital Photo Enlarging article describes the important difference between using a hardware photo enlarger and digital photo enlargement software like Imagener. Before computers, photographers and photo enthusiasts use to enlarge images using an expensive piece of hardware that looked like a huge microscope. This article explains why today’s modern photo enlargers are much easier, faster and provide better results.

  • Forcing Resolution Into Images

    How To Increase Resolution While Maintaining Image Size
    Kneson’s Imagener can be used on images below our recommended size of 300 DPI to possibly provide resolution sufficient to send to a professional printer. The liklihood of achieving a satisfactory result depends on the photo’s physical dimension, it’s beginning resolution and the actual content of the image. This exciting article demonstrates how to increase the resolution of an image and resize it back to it’s original physical dimension in a two‑step process that is a must read.

  • Top Six Photo Enlargement Tips

    Photo enlargement rules to get the best possible results
    These tips encompass basic procedures necessary in the environment of photo enlargement. Image resolution plays an important role in all of these suggestions, because the resolution of an image is among the top considerations when considering using an image enlarger. No software can create image information that is not there to begin with, and this becomes more true as image complexity increases. Using forced resolution techniques while knowing the role of the beginning resolution and lossy formats is more easily accomplished if your computer has sufficient memory and uses an image enlarger like Imagener that can both enlarge and sharpen photos.

Help Pages Percent Complete: 50%
Saving & Printing Enlarged Images

Join The Thousands Of Satisfied Imagener Users